Project Update: San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church

Work Now Progressing at Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church

Project team at kick-off meeting

Following an initial site visit with the project team and State Historical Fund staff in early fall 2020, work now progresses at Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church in far southwestern Colorado.

The Hispano residents of the settlement of Tiffany, located along the old Denver & Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG) line to Durango, lovingly constructed the modest yet beautiful Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church in 1928. Colorado Preservation, Inc. listed the church as one of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places in 2019 and La Plata County added it to its Register of Historic Places later that same year.

Efforts to restore the church received much favorable publicity recently and the site caretakers and project partners are excited about the progress so far! Recent efforts include a meeting with architect Barbara Darden of Scheuber + Darden Architects and consulting engineers Jedidiah Williamson of Logos Structural and geotechnical engineer Dave Trautner Geotech LLC, to complete fieldwork designed to prepare construction documents to set the stage for preservation work on the church.

Wendy Allen of SEAS provided archaeological monitoring in conjunction with trenching work next to the foundation of the building, determining the condition of the poured in place foundation and the presence of sub-surface water that might be impacting its condition.

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Project Update: Slayton Ranch Work Center

Phase One of Slayton Ranch Work Center Nearing Completion

Slayton Ranch House

Slayton Ranch Work Center consists of four historic buildings (the House, Shop/Warehouse, Garage and Root Cellar) and is listed on the National Register. The site functioned as the headquarters of the Land Utilization Project (LUP) during the New Deal era, housing government program staff and demonstration projects for soil conservation and agricultural techniques following the environmental crises of the 1930s in northeastern Colorado.

Colorado Preservation, Inc is managing this first phase of work, which entailed rehabilitating the roof of the House and exterior rehabilitation of the Shop/Warehouse including roof, siding, doors, and window. A final meeting and walkthrough took place in September 2020 with the U.S. Forest Service (owner representative), the State Historical Fund, Form + Works Design Group, and A&M Renovations.

Slayton Ranch House roof
Slayton Ranch Shop/Warehouse
Slayton Ranch Shop/Warehouse, north and west elevation

Colorado Preservation, Inc. serves as the fiscal agent and grant/project administrator in partnership with the Forest Service to preserve and develop the reuse for this unique property.

The project team hopes to continue its close and important partnership into the future. This collaboration would lead to rehabilitating the interior of the main house as a visitor and interpretive center, telling the history of the New Deal Era Land Utilization Project, and to Slayton Ranch Work Center becoming a major attraction along the adjacent Pawnee Pioneer Trails Scenic Byway.

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Project Update: Homestead Meadows

Hidden Homestead Meadows

Laycook Homestead

Historic places and the people who cherish them are all around us. Sometimes they are in plain sight, and other times one must travel long, bumpy rounds to find them! In early October 2020, Colorado Preservation, Inc. was introduced to the unique and out-of-the-way conglomeration of historic homesteading sites located between Lyons and Estes Park in Larimer County, called Homestead Meadows National Historic District.

Owned and managed by the U.S. Forest Service, a partner with Colorado Preservation, Inc. on the Briggsdale Work Center project, Homestead Meadows consists of eight historic homesteads first settled in the late 1880s, connected via low, original wagon roads. Today exhibit original homesteading wooden cabins, barns, outbuildings, and hidden artifacts, providing information and evidence of early pioneer life in this mountainous landscape. Most visitors to Homestead Meadows hike, bike, or come by horseback via a network of easy to moderate trails to this little-known area of the National Forest System in north-central Colorado.

Barn at Irvin Homestead
Lumber house at Irvin Homestead
Log cabin at Irvin Homestead

The rich and unique history of homesteading in this area inspires preservation from the Forest Service and local community members. Last summer, HistoriCorps assisted in reroofing an annex to the main house at the Laycook Homestead. Local volunteers have also since worked hard this past summer to completely reroof and stabilize the main house and other site features to hopefully preserve through another winter. In addition to their efforts and preservation skills, these volunteers and the Forest Service seek ideas and other partnership opportunities on how to best preserve the plethora of nationally significant historic resources in Homestead Meadows.

Main House and Laycook Homestead. Roof rehabilitated in summer 2020 by local volunteers.

Colorado Preservation, Inc. is excited to have had the opportunity to travel the long, bumpy roads to see Homestead Meadows in person (imagine being an original homesteader in the 1880s!) and to begin brainstorming ways to assist the Forest Service and local community members on historic preservation of Homestead Meadows into the future. For more information or ideas on how to help, contact Jane Daniels, director of preservation services, jdaniels@coloradopreservation.org.

Larry Fullenkamp (U.S. Forest Service) and Drew Webb (local volunteer) in front of Brown Homestead cabin.
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2020 Technical Training Workshops

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