Beaumont House

Year Listed: 2004
County: Pueblo County
Construction Date: 1889
Threat When Listed: Development
Status: SAVE
 

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Pueblo’s old northside neighborhood was a place of grandeur, boasting some of Colorado’s finest architecture.  A handful of successful businessmen who lived inthis neighborhood made a name for themselves statewide and helped put Pueblo on the map.  Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Beaumont home was designed by Morris Stuckert near Pueblo’s Mineral Palace Park and the Grand. The house represents residences within the area associated with the John H. Thatcher family; one of Pueblo’s most well known citizens in the city’s late 19th century boom years. Beaumont was a close associate, secretary and confidante of Thatcher, as well as a prominent Pueblo citizen in his own right.

After initially wanting to demolish the building, the owner, Parkview Medical Center, obtained a grant from the State Historical Fund which surveyed the Historic Northside Neighborhood in 2004, including the Beaumont Home. Since being listed on the Endangered Places, a Historic Structure Assessment was completed and rehabilitation of the interior has been completed. The home is currently used by Parkview as a residence for visiting physicians. 

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4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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