Bradford Perley House

 

bradford-perley-save
 
Year Listed: 2002
County: Jefferson County
Construction Date: 1872
Threat When Listed: Natural Elements – Fire, Demolition by Neglect – Vacant
Status: SAVE-2006
 
 

Residence of Major Robert Boyles Bradford, a prominent Denver pioneer who founded the Bradford Wagon Road, a principal route in the 1860s from Denver to Leadville and South Park. Located in present-day Ken Caryl Ranch, a suburb southwest of Denver. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Previously considered an eyesore in the midst of a spectacular open space park, increased knowledge of the site’s significance created support for its preservation. The Ken Caryl Ranch Master Association and the State Historical Fund helped fund development of a site assessment and plan. In 2004, the Ken Caryl Ranch Master Association, the State Historical Fund, the Gates Family Foundation, the John B. and Mildred Holmes Foundation, the Boettcher Foundation, and others funded the structural stabilization to develop the site as an outdoor theater and interpretive education center. The site had been used as a laboratory for archaeology students from Metropolitan State College, the Colorado School of Mines, and the University of Denver. The project earned the Stephen H. Hart Award for excellence in preservation from the Colorado Historical Society in 2004.

Additional Links
Visit the Bradfor Perley House
Ken-Caryl Ranch Master Association
Jefferson County Historical Commission

 

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Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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