Grant Avenue Church

grant-avenue-church-saved

Year Listed: 2002
County: Denver County
Construction Date: 1907
Threat When Listed: Development
Status: SAVE
 
 

For nearly one hundred years, the Grant Avenue Community Church and Sacred Space has graced the corner of South Grant and Cedar in Denver.  While the name has changed, the building has always played an important role of service and involvement in the surrounding neighborhood.  Dedicated in 1907, building, with its blond brick, red clay tile roof, and distinctive corner tower, once housed the thriving Grant Avenue Methodist Church.  As the urban congregation declined, by 2000, developers were knocking on the doors, pitching a loft project.  Faced with the potential loss of the building, the church donated the building to the community and the congregation voted to form a non-profit organization, he Grant Avenue Community Center & Sacred Place, Inc.

At the time of its listing on the Endangered Places list in 2002, the building needed more than $2.5 million to update electrical, mechanical and plumbing systems as well as to address accessibility and safety issues.  Through fundraising and a number of grant sources (including the State Historic Fund, Piton Foundation, Gates Foundation, and the Boettcher Foundation) the necessary upgrades were made including addressing issues with the roof and restore the wooden louvers in the bell tower.

Today, the Community Center is home to a number of local nonprofit and arts groups  in addition to ongoing use by several small church congregations.  From growing church congregation to endangered place, the Grant Avenue Community Center and Sacred Space has now entered into a new phase of its evolution, bringing vibrancy to the neighborhood once again.  It is a wonderful example of what creative thinking, community partnerships, and dedication can produce.  The building is listed on the State Register of Historic Places.

Additional Links:
Grant Avenue Church

 

 

Donate to CPI

We hope you will extend your appreciation for Colorado's past into an investment in its future by making a tax-deductible gift today.

Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

Join our Email List