Riverside Cemetery

Year Listed: 2008
County: Denver, Adams County
Construction Date: 1876
Threat When Listed: Lack of Maintenance
Status: IN PROGRESS
 

Incorporated in 1876, Riverside Cemetery is the oldest operating cemetery in Colorado. Landscape engineer Harvey C. Lowrie created a park-like setting with dense trees, lush grasses, and a central rose garden. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the 77 acre site contains a wealth of unique monuments, including Lester Drake’s log cabin replica and the nation’s largest collection of zinc monuments. The administration building, constructed in 1903, was designed by notable Denver architect Frank Edbrooke. Those buried in Riverside read like a “who’s who” of Colorado history: Augusta Tabor, Barney and Julia Ford, Silas Soule, and all four territorial governors – John Evans, A. Cameron Hunt, Samuel H. Elbert, and John L. Routt. Not only is it one of the oldest cemeteries in the state, but at the turn of the 20th century, most pioneer graves from other city cemeteries were relocated to Riverside.

Riverside is operated and owned by the Fairmount Cemetery Company, which also owns and operates Fairmount Cemetery. Unlike Fairmount, Riverside was not started with an endowment for continued care, and its water rights were based on a gentleman’s agreement from the 1890s. In the 1970s, the water rights changed hands, and the new owner was not willing to honor the agreement. Since the loss of their court battle to retain the water rights, the cemetery has been sporadically watered due to extremely high water costs.

Throughout its lifetime, the one constant at Riverside has been the changing landscape; the earliest improvements were made by the families themselves or if they had the means, they hired someone to do it for them.  Others left their plots as they were, pure prairie.  Landscaped plots died out if the family moved or passed on; a common occurrence in old cemeteries without endowments.

Like many historic sites in Colorado, during the 20th century Riverside was planted with non-native plants.  In 2008, the Fiarmount Heritage Foundation, stewards for the preservation of Riverside, launched a plan to develop an environmentally sustainable landscape in partnership with Riverside families, horticulturists, preservationists, universities, civic groups, and concerned citizens.  Under the leadership and guidance of the Fairmount Heritage Foundation a sustainable landscaping has been planted that incorporates native plantings that do not require heavy watering.  Volunteers have been documenting, assessing and preserving the Riverside monuments with the help of State Historical Fund grants.

Additional Links:
Events at the Riverside Cemetery: Fairmount Heritage Foundation

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4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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