Rock Creek Stage Stop

Year Listed: 2000
County: Routt County
Construction Date: 1880
Threat When Listed: Demolition by Neglect – Vacant
Status: SAVE

Originally built by James and Katherine Gates in the 1880s, the Rock Creek Stage Stop served as a family home, hotel, post office, and stage stop.  It was a halfway station on the first Wells Fargo mail route into Yampa Valley and as a service center for settlers until the railroad line took over in 1887. Travelers going between Steamboat Springs and Kremmling stopped here before continuing their journey.  The stage stop is listed on National Register of Historic Places.

Listed on the Endangered Places list in 2000, the stage stop was in desperate need of stabilization and restoration.

Now listed as a Save, its stabilization was the result of generous funding from the State Historical Fund, hours of labor by dedicated volunteers and contractors, exemplary work from Mountain Architecture and a partnership between the Steamboat Springs’ Tread of Pioneers Museum, Historic Routt County!, the Colorado Division of Wildlife, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Forest Service.  Mountain Architecture was hired to stabalize and restore the building.  Creative fundraising such as a raffle fundraiser event with two lucky winners receiving 150 lps of fresh Yampa Valley grass-fed beef ensured community support in addition to funding.

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Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at

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