Toltec Hotel

Year Listed: 1998
County: Las Animas County
Construction Date: 1910
Threat When Listed: Demolition
Status: SAVE
 

Built in 1910, the Toltec Hotel stands as one of Trinidad’s treasures.  One of many architecturally diverse landmark buildings within the El Corizon de Trinidad National Register Historic District, the Toltec is the only surviving terra cotta building in Trinidad.  During the coal mine strike of 1913-14, during which the Ludlow Massacre took place, union organizers held meetings at the hotel.

Years of neglect and abandonment took their toll on thetoltec-hotel-nominated once thriving hotel and it was listed as an Endangered Place in 1998.  A leaky roof had caused extensive damage to the interior and with an unsympathetic owner in charge of the building, the Toltec appeared destined for demolition.  At the time of listing, a demolition order was in place for the hotel.  Local activists lead by Colorado Preservation, Inc. rallied around this local treasure.  Listing on the Endangered Places helped spotlight this gem and heightened awareness of its potential loss, prompting the city of Trinidad to reconsider its fate.

Since 1998, significant progress toward ensuring that the Toltec be passed on to future generations has been made.  The Toltec became an official Save America’s Treasures Project.  In 2000, the City acquired the hotel, saving it from demolition.  A public/private agreement with two local contractors has led to the current process of rehabilitation, in part due to a State Historical Fund grant to repair the roof and stabilize the exterior.  In late 2004, the City of Trinidad sold the building to Shearman Real Estate LLC, a company noted for preservation projects. A several million dollar rehabilitation for the Toltec is now complete, with ten high-end lofts on the upper floors and three commercial units at street level.

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4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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