Kennedy/Mancos Grain Elevator

Kennedy-Mancos Grain Elevator

Year Listed: 2013
County: Montezuma County
Construction Date: 1934
Threat When Listed: Deterioration – Roof missing
Status: Save – 2015


The Mancos Grain Elevator was built in 1934 by Grady Clampitt. Mr. Clampitt and Mr. Luellen, a bordering farmer, grew dryland wheat in fields bordering Mesa Verde National Park on the southeast side; those same fields are used to grow dryland wheat today,and it is the only wheat grown in the Valley at this time.

The Elevator was put in use upon completion and remained in use for an indeterminate number of years following Mr. Clampitt’s  retirement. With the farm no longer in use the Kennedy/Mancos Grain Elevator is currently being used as a storage unit for family belongings.

The Elevator is in a prominent location highly visible from Highway 160, and is considered a landmark. Although agriculture still plays a large role in the economy of the Mancos Valley, there are few structures evidencing the historic heritage of farming that once made the Valley famous. Today ranching and irrigated hay production have replaced dryland grain crop. The Elevator is a statement of the determination of the agricultural community in place at the time it was built. Few examples of this particular unique workmanship are in place anywhere in Montezuma County today. The Kennedy/Mancos Grain Elevator exemplifies some of the issues facing grain elevators across the State, in particular, those located in the Western region where grain production and farming resources are rarer.

The Grain Elevator was originally deteriorating due to a lacking roof, and drainage issues causing portions of the iconic stacked plank construction to fail.  Since listing, the family has raised the necessary funds and hired a contractor to restore the roof.

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Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at

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