Most Endangered Places: Lost but Not Forgotten

Colorado’s Most Endangered Places speaks to the immediacy and severity of threats facing historic sites across the state.  Landmark buildings and landscapes valued as part of the fabric that help define a community can, and do, disappear overnight.  While in some cases a last minute appeal can delay or prevent demolition, more often the heavy equipment rolls forward.  The Most Endangered Places Program was formed as an additional preservation tool to ignite interest, bring technical expertise, identify funding resources, and create partnerships between the important players.

Unfortunately, despite a communities best efforts, significant buildings are lost.  These six Most Endangered Places buildings were demolished, but their loss is not forgotten.  The lessons taught in their demise can serve as examples to other communities throughout Colorado to ensure their architectural heritage remains for future generations.

If you are interested in joining the fight for historic preservation consider nominating a building to the Endangered Places Program, becoming a member of Colorado Preservation, Inc, and visiting our Call for Volunteers page to learn the latest efforts across the state.


Christian Science Church (1998)

Columbian Elementary (2004)

Currigan given-institute

Currigan Exhibition Hall (2000)

Given Institute (2011)

Kit_Carson_Hotel_(La_Junta,_CO)_from_SE_1 willowcroft

Kit Carson Hotel (2003)

Willowcroft Manor & Farm (2010)

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We hope you will extend your appreciation for Colorado's past into an investment in its future by making a tax-deductible gift today.

Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at

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