Most Endangered Places: Lost but Not Forgotten

Colorado’s Most Endangered Places speaks to the immediacy and severity of threats facing historic sites across the state.  Landmark buildings and landscapes valued as part of the fabric that help define a community can, and do, disappear overnight.  While in some cases a last minute appeal can delay or prevent demolition, more often the heavy equipment rolls forward.  The Most Endangered Places Program was formed as an additional preservation tool to ignite interest, bring technical expertise, identify funding resources, and create partnerships between the important players.

Unfortunately, despite a communities best efforts, significant buildings are lost.  These six Most Endangered Places buildings were demolished, but their loss is not forgotten.  The lessons taught in their demise can serve as examples to other communities throughout Colorado to ensure their architectural heritage remains for future generations.

If you are interested in joining the fight for historic preservation consider nominating a building to the Endangered Places Program, becoming a member of Colorado Preservation, Inc, and visiting our Call for Volunteers page to learn the latest efforts across the state.


Christian Science Church (1998)


Elementary (2004)

Currigan given-institute

Currigan Exhibition Hall (2000)

Given Institute (2011)


Great Western Sugar Factory (2016)

Kit Carson Hotel (2003)


Willowcroft Manor & Farm (2010)



Donate to CPI

We hope you will extend your appreciation for Colorado's past into an investment in its future by making a tax-deductible gift today.

Featured Project

Preservation for a Changing Colorado

The 2017 update, Preservation for a Changing Colorado, resulted from a partnership between Colorado Preservation and History Colorado and Colorado Preservation, Inc. Prepared by Clarion Associates, the new report and accompanying website document the economic benefits of rehabilitation projects, analyzes property values and neighborhood stability in local historic districts, and summarizes the increasing impact of heritage tourism, private preservation development and the success of Colorado’s Main Street program. In a key finding, researchers found that for every $1 million spent on historic preservation in Colorado leads to $1.03 million in additional spending, 14 new jobs, and $636,700 in increased household incomes across the state! The 2017 report also considers the important role preservation plays in helping Coloradans provide new spaces for creative communities and co-working, create and sustain meaningful places, respond to the state’s changing demographics, and address climate concerns. Click Here to see the full report, "Preservation for a Changing Colorado".

Join our Email List