Project Update: San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church

Work Now Progressing at Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church

Project team at kick-off meeting

Following an initial site visit with the project team and State Historical Fund staff in early fall 2020, work now progresses at Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church in far southwestern Colorado.

The Hispano residents of the settlement of Tiffany, located along the old Denver & Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG) line to Durango, lovingly constructed the modest yet beautiful Iglesia de San Antonio/Tiffany Catholic Church in 1928. Colorado Preservation, Inc. listed the church as one of Colorado’s Most Endangered Places in 2019 and La Plata County added it to its Register of Historic Places later that same year.

Efforts to restore the church received much favorable publicity recently and the site caretakers and project partners are excited about the progress so far! Recent efforts include a meeting with architect Barbara Darden of Scheuber + Darden Architects and consulting engineers Jedidiah Williamson of Logos Structural and geotechnical engineer Dave Trautner Geotech LLC, to complete fieldwork designed to prepare construction documents to set the stage for preservation work on the church.

Wendy Allen of SEAS provided archaeological monitoring in conjunction with trenching work next to the foundation of the building, determining the condition of the poured in place foundation and the presence of sub-surface water that might be impacting its condition.

This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

Donate to CPI

We hope you will extend your appreciation for Colorado's past into an investment in its future by making a tax-deductible gift today.

Featured Project

Preservation for a Changing Colorado

The 2017 update, Preservation for a Changing Colorado, resulted from a partnership between Colorado Preservation and History Colorado and Colorado Preservation, Inc. Prepared by Clarion Associates, the new report and accompanying website document the economic benefits of rehabilitation projects, analyzes property values and neighborhood stability in local historic districts, and summarizes the increasing impact of heritage tourism, private preservation development and the success of Colorado’s Main Street program. In a key finding, researchers found that for every $1 million spent on historic preservation in Colorado leads to $1.03 million in additional spending, 14 new jobs, and $636,700 in increased household incomes across the state! The 2017 report also considers the important role preservation plays in helping Coloradans provide new spaces for creative communities and co-working, create and sustain meaningful places, respond to the state’s changing demographics, and address climate concerns. Click Here to see the full report, "Preservation for a Changing Colorado".