Hangar 61 Rehabilitation

Location

Denver, CO (located within the former Stapleton International Airport complex)

Date of Construction

1959

History of the Hangar 

Constructed in 1959 within Denver’s former Stapleton International Airport complex, the Ideal Basic Cement Corporate Hangar (now known as Hangar 61), an 8,500 square foot cement structure, is an example of sophisticated engineering creating an innovative architectural design. The Hangar was engineered by Milo S. Ketchum, a senior partner in the Denver firm of Ketchum &Konkel, and designed by Fisher, Fisher and Davis. In 1995, the City and County of Denver closed Stapleton International Airport and opened Denver International Airport twenty miles to the east. As development was taking shape at Stapleton, no use had been found for Hangar 61 and the possibility of demolition seemed eminent. In the spring of 2005, the property was nominated for and named to Colorado’s Most Endangered Places List and subsequently nominated for designation as a Denver Landmark.

Project Description

Colorado Preservation, Inc. purchased the property and in partnership with 620 Corp., a private developer, developed construction documents for its reuse. Structural and exterior repairs were the first phase of the rehabilitation work. During this time, the property was continually marketed in the hopes that a buyer could be located to assist with the design of the interior. On May 10th, 2010 the Hangar was sold to the Stapleton Fellowship Church.  Their plans for the interior include a 300-seat auditorium, state-of-the-art stage, children’s ministry space, and gathering areas to be made available for public use.

Project Team

Project was supported by Colorado Preservation, Inc., 620 Corp., the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and the State Historical Fund.

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Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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