Hotchkiss Barn

Hotchkiss Barn

Year listed: 2013
County: Delta County
Status: IN PROGRESS

 

The Hotchkiss Barn is a unique 19th century eclectic masonry barn. The Hotchkiss Barn is the oldest major building in the North Fork Valley surrounding the Town of Hotchkiss and reflects the agricultural nature of the area. It was built by Enos T. Hotchkiss who led a group of settlers into the area during August 1881, and who was instrumental in founding the town that bears his name.

The barn itself is unique because of its 12-inch thick walls of brick and its transverse timber frame structure. These bricks, made close to the site beginning in 1885, gave birth to a masonry industry that provided bricks for several other prominent buildings nearby. The timber columns were hand hewn, and then joined with rough sawn beams and braces using pegged mortise tenon joints.

In 2010, a macroburst left the building with ¼ of its roof demolished and its brick walls in a shattered condition. There is a large hole at the southwest end that leaves the remainder of the building susceptible to further damage from rain, wind and snowstorms. The wythes of the remaining brick walls have separated and are in danger of collapse.

The Hotchkiss Barn is the oldest major building in the North Fork Valley surrounding the Town of Hotchkiss. A restoration for the Barn would hopefully allow for public access and a variety of community events including barn dances that were historically held in the space in the late 1880s.

Additional Links:
Donate to Save the Hotchkiss Barn: Western CO Interpretive Association
Follow Save the Hotchkiss Barn Facebook Page

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