Grain and Feed Storage

Grain storage was an essential feature on most farms. This included both the storage of feed for livestock as well as the storage of grain for market, with the farmer waiting for the best price. Many farmers created additional storage on their farms in the mid-twentieth century, constructing elevators or converting barns to elevators. The government regulated these granaries as official storage. However, as government storage regulations became more stringent and grain trucks became too large to conveniently fit in farm elevators, most farmers stopped using farmstead elevators and store their crops at the commercial elevators in Amherst, Haxtun, and Holyoke.

Grain was also stored in wooden or metal bins. Often farm buildings such as garages or barns could also be converted to grain storage. Evidence of this use can be seen in roof openings used to pour grain into the building and in internal or external reinforcement of buildings with bracing.

Silos were used to store green corn. The corn fermented, creating silage that was commonly feed to dairy cows.

 

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Featured Project

4 Bar 4 Ranch

Homesteaded in 1895 by Dick McQueary to provide a stop for the Georgetown Stage Line, the 320-acre 4 Bar 4 Ranch has strong ties to Grand County and Colorado's heritage. The Georgetown Stage Line traveled on the road through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch from Idaho Springs to Hot Sulphur Springs over Berthoud Pass. In 1895 a roadhouse and stage stop were constructed on the ranch. The hotel and barn were constructed using trees from the Ranch property, and the hotel remained open for travelers coming over Berthoud Pass by horseback and wagon until 1913. With the coming of the automobile, the roadway over Berthoud Pass and through the 4 Bar 4 Ranch was considered an integral part of the Trans-Continental “Midland Trail” highway. Following the closing of the stage line, the ranch continued to host travelers until 1912 or 1913 when it was purchased and converted into a Ford Motor Company . Ford vehicles were sold here until 1917, when Harry Larkin purchased the ranch site. Today emergency efforts are underway to ensure it survives through the winter. Donations are in need. To learn more, contact Jennifer Orrigo Charles at jorrigocharlges@coloradopreservation.org.

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