Apple Trees for Golden History Museum

MORP Donates Heirloom Orchard Trees to Golden History Museum

Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project’s warehouse of trees ready for Golden History Museum and Park

Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project (MORP), which grew from the fruits of efforts to save the historic Gold Medal Orchard (listed on Colorado’s Most Endangered Places in 2015 and declared a “Save” in 2021) recently donated apple trees that were historically grown in the Golden area to Golden History Museum and Park. The trees will plant in the fall, adding to and making up Golden Heritage Apple Orchard at Golden History Park. As noted by MORP co-director Addie Schuenemeyer, “We selected varieties that were historically grown in Golden. MORP is able to donate heritage apple trees to community spaces that can care for them thanks to support from the USDA, Colorado Department of Agriculture, Colorado Garden Foundation and others.” The museum plans to add tree signage acknowledging the work of MORP to preserve Colorado’s fruit growing heritage. Former Colorado Preservation, Inc. (CPI) employee Cindy Nasky and her husband Mark helped Golden History Museum Director Nathan Richie and Board President Michael Wood make the connection to MORP and CPI and to spread the word about the project.

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